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Native Americans and New York
(Fiction & Nonfiction)


New York City has to be one of the greatest places in America, if not the world. Luckily for us, many authors have chronicled The Big Apple's antics in a way just right for kids.

Here are some of the books available. This is not yet a complete list, but I'm adding books to the list daily. If you wish to purchase any of these books, click on either the title or the book cover to be directed to Amazon.com. As a warning, I have put up pictures of the book covers to give you somewhat an idea of the style of each book (I know, I know. "Don't judge a book by its cover") so the pages may load slowly, depending on the speed of your internet connection.

The categories below are sorted by approximate age group and topical categories. Feel free to browse around. The same links are located on the left side of your screen. To return back to this page, simply click on the "Welcome" link on the left.

If this website came up without frames, click here to see the complete "New York City Books for Kids" website with frames.


Other Pages of Interest:
Fiction & Historical Fiction: General Books About New York City (Nonfiction) | Fiction NYC Picture Books and "Easy Reader" Stories (Ages 4-8) | Fiction NYC Books (Ages 9-12) | New York Fiction for Young Adults | New York Historical Fiction (Colonial Period and Revolutionary War) | New York Historical Fiction (Ellis Island & Immigration) | New York Historical Fiction (Life in the 1800s) | New York Historical Fiction (Life in the 1900s)

NYC History: New York Biographies | Native Americans from New York (History and Historical Fiction) | New York History (Colonial Period and Revolutionary War) | New York History (Immigration and Ellis Island) | New York History (The 1800s) | New York History (The 1900s) | The World Trade Center and September 11, 2001 |

NYC Locations: The Statue of Liberty | The Empire State Building | Central Park | NYC Art Museums (Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, etc.) | NYC's American Museum of Natural History | Harlem Books (Including books about the Harlem Renaissance) | Chinatown Books | Little Italy Books | The New York City Subway System | Brooklyn Books | The Bronx Books | Queens Books | Staten Island Books | Long Island Books | Upstate New York Books | New York State Books

Life and Travel in NYC: Thanksgiving in New York City | Christmas in New York City | New York Sports Teams and Players The NYC Fire Department (FDNY) and NY Police Department (NYPD) | General Books About Cities | New York City and New York State Test Preparation and Study Guides | New York Regents Review Books | Parenting in New York City | New York Travel Guides for Families with Children

NYC Toys, Puzzles, and Games (For Kids & Adults) | Amazon.com Coupon Codes

Fiction and Nonfiction for Beginning Readers



Small Wolf
(An I Can Read Book, Level 3, Grades 2-4)

by Nathaniel Benchley
Awards:
  • Best Children's Books for Spring 1972 (SLJ)
  • Children's Books of 1972 (Library of Congress)

    When Small Wolf encounters settlers on the Island of Hills, now known as Manhattan, he learns that their ideas about owning land are much different from his. As timely as when it was first published in 1972, this poignant story about the impact of European settlers on Native American people is even more dramatic in this new full color edition.

    Description from Publisher

    Poignancy and honesty mark the fictional account of the displacement of Native Americans from the island of Manhattan. Small Wolf and his tribe must flee their home to accommodate the greedy newcomers' inhospitable notions about the ownership of land. Now paired with detailed, full-color illustrations -- which, unfortunately, depict Small Wolf and his father as wearing only loincloths in all but the severest weather -- Benchley's text offers newly independent readers a grave glimpse of American history

    Description from Horn Book

  • Brother Wolf: A Seneca Tale

    By Harriet P. Taylor
    This Seneca tale relates how Wolf and Raccoon are friends, but they enjoy teasing each other. After the teasing has turned to insults, Raccoon comes upon the sleeping Wolf and covers his eyes with tar and clay. The mixture hardens, and Wolf has to beg the birds to peck away the seal so that he can see again. After taking his revenge by rolling the sleeping Raccoon's hollow tree home down a hill, Wolf shows his gratitude to the birds by painting their feathers with bright dyes and offers his forgiveness to Raccoon by painting stripes on his tail. Taylor cites several sources for this pleasing pourquoi tale. In the appended notes, she comments on the Seneca and the roles of Wolf and Raccoon in their stories. The large-scale batik illustrations, with their distinctive look, will please young children with their clarity and freshness.

    Description from Booklist

    The rippling hues of batik lend color and clarity to a child-friendly adaptation from Seneca folklore. The conflict between Wolf and Raccoon is playful, but sometimes their teasing goes too far. On this occasion, Raccoon plasters mud over the sleeping wolf's eyes, and Wolf wakes thinking he is blind. After having the plaster pecked off by his bird friends, he gets his revenge by rolling Raccoon down a hill in an empty tree trunk. Wolf rewards the birds by painting them beautiful colors. Any retelling, in a glutted field, must have something to distinguish itself from the pack. Taylor exhibits the necessary originality and winsomeness to do just that, without deviating too far from traditional folk art styles. Anyone who has camped in raccoon country knows the accuracy of the critter's depiction as a prankster; details in the text, such as Raccoon's rolling on his back, show Taylor's knowledge of the animal kingdom and bring honesty to the tale.

    Description from Kirkus Reviews

    In this lighthearted pourquoi tale from Seneca lore, petty arguing results in retribution on both sides, but all is quickly forgiven. Wolf, in a bad mood, gets involved in an all-night exchange of insults with Raccoon, who waits until his adversary is asleep to coat his eyes with a plaster of clay and tar. Unable to see in the morning, Wolf howls for help. Birds peck away the patches and Wolf promises them a reward. Then he and his feathered friends find Raccoon sleeping in a hollow log and roll him downhill. The colorless birds' reward is to be painted as brightly as the flowers from dyes of the earthberries, clay, and plants. Raccoon wants to be decorated, too, and Wolf, all differences forgiven, gives him black rings around his tail. The tale, clearly told in simple language, is greatly enhanced by the vivid colors of Taylor's skillful batiks. Strong lines and somewhat primitive shapes create easily recognized species of animals and plants. The characters' expressions vary from pleasant to fierce. Even before the birds' transformation, the world is full of color. The treatment of the sky is particularly effective, changing from a wonderful night purple to an intense early morning yellow or an interior forest green. A long list of secondary sources is included.

    Description from School Library Journal

    Song of the Hermit Thrush: An Iroquois Legend

    By Gloria Dominic
    This Iroquois legend tells what happens when the animals of the forest hold a contest to choose which will sing a song to greet the new day.

    The Legends of the World opens readers' minds to the diverse cultures of Native America, Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, and the Americas through enchanting tales passed down through countless generations. Each book in the series features geographical, historical, and cultural information. Illustrated in full color.

    Description from Publisher

    Hiawatha

    By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    Awards:
    A Booklist Editor's Choice Book.
    A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year.



    Weaving together the beautiful oral traditions of the American Indian into a grand epic poem, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's The Song of Hiawatha is a renowned classic. Now award-winning artist Susan Jeffers presents a stunning visual interpretation of Hiawatha's boyhood life.

    Description from Publisher

    Exquisite, detailed illustrations grace this picture book which presents the part of Longfellow's stirring poem dealing with Hiawatha's boyhood and his relationship to his grandmother, who teaches him about the ways of animals and the forces of nature. The illustrator's careful research on flora and fauna and woodland Indian culture is evident. Some of the poem's background is explained in a note at the beginning. This is truly a picture book for all ages.

    Description from Children's Literature

    The Iroquois

    By Richard Gaines
    These brief books sympathetically present the history and community life practices of three Native American tribes. While the material is not new, the texts are simple enough for younger and lower-level readers. Effective full-color illustrations of tribal practices and crafts and a few photos are included. Iroquois and Nez Perce include a myth, but the storytellers or sources are not credited. Nez Perce includes Chief Joseph's moving speech. All of the texts, however, are somewhat repetitive, some terms are not adequately explained, and the glossaries are in very small type. Sentences often begin with conjunctions and adverbs, a questionable grammatical example for readers this young. Still, these are adequate introductions to the multiplicity of Native peoples.

    Description from School Library Journal

    An Algonquian Year : The Year According to the Full Moon

    By Michael McCurdy
    As the moon waxes and wanes, her cycles set a pattern of life for those who live beneath her silver glow. For the Northern Algonquians in precolonial America, these rhythms served to measure out the year. January’s Hard Times Moon means biting winds and long nights, and February’s moon brings the big snow. Now animals and people alike search for food; the land is locked in a deep, icy cold. But by the April and May moons, one can fish at night by torchlight and leave the wigwam door open to the rising sun in the east. Soon the summer moons of planting and ripening will guide the daily work of the tribe. Then come the fertile autumn moons of harvesting to ready the people for yet another hard winter. In graceful prose and stunning scratchboard illustrations, Michael McCurdy follows the important path the moon made in Algonquian lives. He brings to life the seasonal cycles of work, play, and survival — a busy and fulfilling year punctuated by the beauty of the full moon.

    Description from Publisher

    How Rabbit Lost His Tail By Ann Tompert
    Seneca legend has it that Rabbit once had a long and flowing tail; Tompert (A Carol for Christmas) and Chwast offer a sturdy look at just how he lost it.

    Rabbit, busy snacking in a willow grove, is giddy and begins to race around a willow tree. Snow begins to fall, and "it seemed to Rabbit that the faster he raced around the willow tree, the faster and thicker the snow fell." Exhausted, he falls asleep on a willow branch and doesn't wake up until spring, when he discovers that without snow, he is stranded high above the ground. Porcupine, Badger, and Beaver can't help the scared Rabbit climb down, but Squirrel suggests that he jump. Rabbit takes the plunge, but his tail remains behind, stuck in the crotch of the tree. Tompert has fashioned a good and simple porquoi tale from the Native American legend; Chwast's bold, color-drenched artwork, woodcut in style, gives the story a welcome verve.

    Description from Kirkus Reviews

    Eastern Woodlands Indians

    By Mir Tamim Ansary
    Introduces the history, dwellings, artwork, religious beliefs, clothing, food, and other elements of life of the Native American peoples of the eastern woodlands of North America.

    Description from Publisher

    Woodlands Indians Coloring Book

    By Peter F. Copeland
    Carefully researched, finely rendered scenes depict over four centuries of tribal life, including views of Pequot and Massachusett hunters in the early 1600s, Ottawa warriors of the 17th and 19th centuries, an Iroquois woman pounding corn (1910), Mohawk construction workers (1970) and more. 41 illustrations with fact-filled

    Description from Publisher

    Boy Who Lived With Bears and Other Iroquois Stories

    By Joseph Bruchac
    Gathered here are six Iroquois stories that have been passed down by generations of storytellers - around the central fire of an Iroquois longhouse, in a kitchen, or on a back porch - and told here by renowned Native American storyteller Joseph Bruchac. In this collection the reader will meet, among others, vain Buzzard, who flies to the Creator to bring back clothes for all the birds; tiny Chipmunk, who takes on great Bear in a challenge to keep the sun from rising; and a young boy who has lost his own family and finds love in the home of the Bears.

    Description from Publisher

    An orphan abused by his guardian uncle finds refuge as a member of a bear family in the title story of this collection of six Iroquois teaching tales, which spring from Bruchac's close association with Iroquois elders and are sourced in tales he heard while growing up. An introduction that doesn't overwhelm puts the tales into historical and cultural context. Bruchac's style is clean and spare. His direct, immediate language makes the book accessible to a wide range of children, including reluctant and new readers, and the humor and inherent drama make the tales ideal for reading and telling aloud. The seven full-page color paintings by Murv Jacob are brightly framed with floral and other patterns that enhance the vibrant compositions, and, whether animal or human, the characters are nicely individualized and energetically executed. A gray flowered border surrounds each page of text, the type is large, the design is spacious, and the detailing is attractive. This is a fine example of good book-making, which combines quality of content with quality of craft.

    Description from Booklist

    An appealing collection of six traditional Iroquois tales retold in classic storytelling language. Although these stories can be found in other anthologies, including Bruchac's Iroquois Stories, they are gathered here for younger children and presented as lessons the tribal elders might pass on during winter story times. The reteller's introduction is instructive and sets the mood for these humorous, moralbut never didactictales. Each one is carefully crafted with precise language and striking images. The title story tells adults to love their children; "How Birds Got Their Feathers" warns readers to be satisfied with what they have; "Chipmunk and Bear" cautions against making fun of others. Jacob's stunning, brilliantly colored paintings, one for each selection, capture the moods clearly and gracefully. A beautiful book in words and pictures that deserves a spot in every folktale collection.

    Description from School Library Journal

    Hiawatha: Messenger of Peace

    By Dennis Brindell Fradin
    A portrait of the great Iroquois leader Hiawatha chronicles his role in bringing peace to the five warring Iroquois tribes and uniting them into the powerful Iroquois Federation, in a biography enhanced by paintings by modern Iroquois artists.

    Description from Publisher

    In Fradin's enlightening work, readers will learn about the real Hiawatha. This courageous, kind man--and inspiring speaker--ensured the survival of his people for 300 years after his death. The author recounts the childhood of this celebrated Iroquois Indian, the tragic murder of his family, stet comma and the incredible strength and forgiveness he found within himself to become a peacemaker between his people's fighting tribes. Hiawatha and a Canadian Indian named Degandawida encouraged the Iroquois to form their own government, which , in turn, created tranquility and humanity throughout that nation. Unlike literary works that describe Hiawatha as godlike or supernatural, this text accurately explains the role he has played in our history.

    Description from Publishers Weekly

    In this brief biography, Fradin shows what Hiawatha's life might have been like by drawing on what is actually known about the Indians of the Longhouse of his time. He clearly labels what is surmised, legend, and known fact as he tells of the adult Hiawatha's role as a peacemaker and as one of the founders of the Iroquois Confederacy. He also mentions aspects of this confederacy that the founders of our nation incorporated into the U. S. Constitution. The book is copiously illustrated with both black-and-white and full-color photographs of Indian artifacts and of paintings and sculpture by Native American artists, all relevant to the text. This attractive volume helps fill the need for good, readable biographies for this age group.

    Description from school Library Journal

    Debunking the false stories of Hiawatha popularized by Longfellow's poem, Fradin tries to get at the truth about the real Iroquois leader who lived about 500 years ago. What the author finds in his careful search is a Hiawatha who was in many ways more remarkable, as well as more human, than the romantic legend. It's hard to get exact facts, and Fradin is scrupulous in distinguishing what is known, what is surmised, and what is legend. It seems that Hiawatha was a great peacemaker. Despite his terrible grief when his wife and children were murdered by his enemy, Hiawatha sought not revenge but community, and by his example he brought five warring tribes together in a national federation with a form of representative government that "many historians claim" became a model for the U.S. Constitution. Perhaps the best part of the book is the illustrations, many of them in color, almost all by Indian artists, collected from museums across the country: they show various views of Hiawatha in his grief and in his struggle.

    Description from Booklist

    The Great Buffalo Race: How the Buffalo Got Its Hump : A Seneca Tale

    By Barbara Juster Esbensen
    After a futile race to the western horizon in search of rain and new grass, a hungry herd of buffalo is punished by the Great Spirit, Haweniyo, in an authentic Seneca tale about how the buffalo got its hump.

    Description from Publisher

    This Seneca tale reveals why buffalo have humps on their backs, and why their faces look down at the earth. It involves patience, courage, a father-son conflict, and the importance of keeping promises. A just punishment follows rebellion.

    Description from Children's Literature



    Fiction For Older Readers



    Trouble's Daughter: The Story of Susanna Hutchinson, Indian Captive

    By Katherine Kirkpatrick
    Susanna Hutchinson is the youngest child of Anne Hutchinson, who was exiled from her Boston community for her radical stand on religious freedom. The family eventually settled on Long Island Sound (today's Co-op City).

    In 1633, Susanna is 9 years old when Lenape Indians massacre her family and take her captive. Despite the massacre, the Lenape treat her well, and she grows to love them, particularly the wise woman of the tribe who reminds Susanna of her mother Anne. Susanna discovers her own visionary powers and uses them to help her adopted people, until, at 14, she is devastated to learn she has been ransomed by a brother and must return to colonial society.

    Description from Publisher

    With this compelling saga, Kirkpatrick comes to the forefront as a historical novelist. In 1663, Susanna Hutchinson, daughter of religious firebrand Anne Hutchinson, moved with her family to the wilds of Long Island so her mother would not be persecuted for her beliefs and public statements. Not long after, Lenape warriors massacre the family and take Susanna hostage. Susanna's evolution from hostile, frightened prisoner to member of the tribe through her transition back to white society is both detailed and credible (although Kirkpatrick explains that, except for one, the Indian characters come from her imagination). The extended author's note tells how Kirkpatrick did her research; that it was extensive shows in the book's rich detail. There is even an appended list of Lenape words and pronunciations. But all the research in the world wouldn't have helped had the telling been ineffective. Happily, Kirkpatrick not only spins a good story, but she also successfully makes readers understand what is happening inside Susanna's head as she tries to come to terms with the fact that the man who murdered her mother is also her rescuer and, in the tribe, her father. Readers will go through the emotional adjustment process with her, making this a book in which children do more then just view history--they see themselves.

    Description from Booklist

    Based on actual events in the life of Susanna Hutchinson, this is the compelling story of a young girl torn by divided loyalties. In 1633, religious freedom acitvist Anne Hutchinson unwittingly moved her family into the center of a war between the Dutch and the native tribes of Long Island. Soon after, her nine-year-old daughter, Susanna, becomes the sole survivor of a brutal Native American massacre. Taken prisoner and then adopted into the Lenape tribe, Susanna fights the native ways. Hated by some, a curiosity to others, Susanna is drawn to Som-kay, the tribal medicine woman. As Som-kay guides her through the ways of the Lenape, Susanna begins to develop an appreciation and eventually affection for her new family. Although her own emerging psychic powers trouble and occasionally scare her, Susanna begins to recognize both the uniqueness and universality of different cultures. After nearly five years with the Lenape, she is reunited with older relatives and once again must struggle with new customs and ways.

    Kirkpatrick tells a gripping tale of a young girl struggling with grief, maturation, loss, and reclamation. While Susanna's coming-of-age story may be more gripping than some, her endurance and survival of personal tragedy brought her an understanding and sense of peace not found by many. Although historical in setting, this is a tale of hope for young adult readers today. Historical notes and a Lenape pronunciation guide are included.

    Description from VOYA

    In this rich and engrossing fictional account of actual events, nine-year-old Susanna is captured by the Lenape after witnessing the massacre of her family and spends the next four years as a member of the tribe. Initially not wanting to "become an Indian," she holds the murder of her family close to her heart, attempts escape, and resists learning the Lenape language. She gains strength from her memories of her famous mother, Anne Hutchinson, the strong-willed and outspoken 17th-century heretic. Gradually, Susanna learns to communicate and partially accepts her new identity as Mee-pahk ("Pretty Leaf"). She finds a strength similar to her mother's in the wise medicine woman, Som-kway, and enjoys the friendship of her sister, Sa-kat. Susanna comes to recognize the inherent humanity of her new family, despite radical cultural differences, and discovers one day, somewhat to her dismay, that she "could no longer hate" them. When arrangements are made to trade her back to her white family, she does not wish to leave the Place of Stringing Beads. Susanna is a heroine after her mother's blood: strong and visionary. Readers will avidly follow her physical and spiritual development as she moves through incomprehension and anguish to self-discovery and an appreciation of Lenape life. The people and culture are warmly realized with a wealth of careful detail and sensitivity that make the characters and sense of place memorable. Top-notch historical fiction.

    Description from School Library Journal

    Echohawk

    By Lynda Durrant
    In 1738, when Jonathan Starr is four, his family is killed by Mohican warriors, one of whom adopts the boy as a surrogate for his own recently deceased son. Renamed Echohawk, Jonathan grows up Mohican, with no memories of his early life until, fatefully, his adoptive father, Glickihigan, sends him and his younger brother to spend the winter with a white teacher and his wife so they may learn English (a not uncommon practice in the eighteenth century). Living among the whites causes the first stirrings of long-forgotten memories. As they become more vivid, Echohawk realizes that he is at a figurative crossroads and must decide which way to walk. Although the second half of the story suffers from some one-dimensional characterizations and a violation of the integrity of the third-person point of view, this is a remarkably powerful and emotionally affecting first novel that is distinguished by Durrant's respect for her characters, a wonderfully apposite, almost grave style, and a seamless integration of the details of daily eighteenth-century life into an absorbing novel of personal growth. Appended material includes a glossary, a list of sources, and useful background information about the setting and its native inhabitants.

    Description from Booklist

    Adopted and raised by Mohicans in the Hudson River Valley during the 1730s, Jonathan Starr is sent to an English settlement to attend school.

    Echohawk was a little boy when he was taken from his white family and adopted into a Mohican tribe. For years Echohawk has been speaking and thinking in the Mohican language. He enjoys hunting with his adoptive father Glickihigan and younger brother Bamaineo. Yet as time passes, Glickihigan thinks an English education will help his sons in the changing world and sends them to be schooled by white people. It's then that Echohawk's earliest memories return. Soon the time will come for him to choose between the world of the Mohicans and the world he came from long ago.

    Description from Publisher

    Skywoman: Legends of the Iroquois

    By Joanne Shenandoah & Douglas M. George
    When Skywoman falls from the upper world, the birds and animals living in the watery place below must catch her and create ground on which she can stand. Thus Turtle Island, the earth, is born. In this beautifully illustrated book, two Native American writers tell the ancient stories of the Iroquois peoples. Beginning with Skyworld and the creation of Earth, the authors weave together tales of creation, of the bravery of children and the compassion of animals, stories of greed and cruelty, reverence, adventure and wonder. The final story tells of the Iroquois Peacemaker and the woman who spread his message among the warring peoples of the northeast. The Great Law of the Peacemaker is preserved by the peoples of the Iroquois Confederacy to this day. In their beautiful and haunting drawings and paintings, John Fadden and his son David capture the spirit of stories they have known all their lives. Skywoman is storytelling at its best. It will be enjoyed by young and old, by everyone who treasures the wisdom and traditions of the first Americans.

    Description from Publisher

    Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison

    By Lois Lenski

    Awards:
    • 1942 Newbery Honor book

    In this classic frontier adventure, Lois Lenski reconstructs the real life story of Mary Jemison, who was captured in a raid as young girl and raised amongst the Seneca Indians. Meticulously researched and illustrated with many detailed drawings, this novel offers an exceptionally vivid and personal portrait of Native American life and customs.

    Description from Publisher

    George Johnson's War by Maureen Garvie and Mary D. Beaty
    Young George Johnson lives an extraordinary life as the son of Sir William Johnson, one of the most powerful men in the Mohawk Valley of colonial New York, and Molly Brant, sister of Iroquois leader Joseph Brant. George’s sheltered life with his extended mixed family comes to a halt when the American War of Independence begins. His father is killed, his older brother Peter enlists, and the valley’s inhabitants struggle with their loyalties. An attack by rebels forces George and his family to seek shelter with his mother’s relatives, and the boy ends up in a Montreal boarding school. In a riveting climax, George, now 13 and back with his family, convinces his mother to let him join in a last raid on the valley where he grew up. In the process he experiences firsthand the brutality and futility of war, and struggles with what it means to be half-Mohawk. Based on meticulous research into actual people and events, this book brings to life a tumultuous time and those who lived in it, most memorably the indomitable matriarch Molly Brant.

    Description from Publisher

    Children of the Longhouse

    By Joseph Bruchac
    Eleven-year-old Ohkwa'ri overhears Grabber and his friends planning to raid a neighboring village and warns the tribal elders, preventing the raid but gaining the wrath of the older boys. When the village decides to hold a game of Tekwaarathon (lacrosse) in an attempt to restore elderly Thunder's Voice to health, Ohkwa'ri realizes he must face those enemies on the playing field. Set in a Mohawk village in the late 1490s, the story offers a detailed look at the traditional Mohawk way of life. Through Ohkwa'ri and his twin sister, Otsi:stia, Bruchac explores the roles of men and women, teaching practices, family relationships, and social life and customs before contact with European explorers and traders. Although the information overshadows the story at times, middle readers interested in traditional practices will find this clear and easy to understand. An afterword describes the efforts of the Mohawk people to return to their traditional lands. A reading list and a glossary are appended.

    Description from Booklist

    Ohkwa'ri and his twin sister, Otsi'stia, 11, are late-15th century Mohawks living in what would become New York State. Both are exemplary young people: He is brave, kind, and respectful of his elders, and she is gentle and wise beyond her years. One day Ohkwa'ri hears an older youth, Grabber, and his cronies planning to raid a nearby Abenaki village, in violation of the Great League of Peace to which all the Iroquois Nations have been committed for decades. When Ohkwa'ri reports what he has heard to the tribal elders he makes a deadly enemy of Grabber. Grabber's opportunity for revenge comes when the entire tribe gathers for the great game of Tekwaarathon (later, lacrosse). Ohkwa'ri knows that he will be in great danger during the long day of play and will have to use all his wits and skills to save himself and his honor. Bruchac (Between Earth and Sky, etc.) saturates his novel with suspense, generating an exciting story that also offers an in-depth look at Native American life centuries ago. The book also offers excellent insights into the powerful role of women in what most readers will presume was a male-dominated society. Thoroughly researched; beautifully written.

    Description from Kirkus Reviews

    The Arrow over the Door

    By Joseph Bruchac
    To fourteen-year-old Samuel Russell, called coward for his peace-loving Quaker beliefs, the summer of 1777 is a time of fear. The British and the Patriots will soon meet in battle near his home in Saratoga, New York. The Quakers are in danger from roaming Indians and raiders--yet to fight back is not the Friends' way. To Stands Straight, a young Abenaki Indian on a scouting mission for the British, all Americans are enemies, for they killed his mother and brother. But in a Quaker Meetinghouse he will come upon Americans unlike any he has ever seen. What will the encounter bring? Based on a real historical incident, this fast-paced and moving story is a powerful reminder that the way of peacecan be walked by all human beings.

    Description from Publisher

    Fourteen-year-old Samuel Russell hates being called a coward because he is a Quaker, and he vows to defend his family if Loyalists or Indians try to harm them. Stands Straight, an Abenaki boy whose mother and brother were murdered by white men, has joined his uncle's scouting party, though he questions why Indians should fight in the white man's war. In alternating narratives, the two boys tell this quietly compelling story, which is based on an actual incident that took place in 1777, just before the Battle of Saratoga. As Samuel's family sits in the meeting with the rest of the Quaker congregation, the Indian scouting party to which Stands Straight belongs surrounds the cabin. Stands Straight follows his uncle Sees-the-Wind inside, and after being assured that there are no weapons in the cabin, the Abenakis leave their bows and arrows outside and sit with the Quakers in silence. At the end of the meeting, the Quakers and the Indians share the handshake of peace, and Sees-the-Wind places an arrow over the cabin's door to show the Abenakis that the Quakers are people of peace. Simple black-and-white drawings reflect the dignified tone of the story, which explores the complexities of the Indian-white relationship, focusing on two lesser-known groups who were involved in the conflict. An author's note provides thorough historical background about the incident, as well as a brief history of the Quakers and the Abenakis. A truly excellent example of historical fiction for the middle-grade/junior-high audience.

    Description from Booklist

    Waiting for Deliverance

    By Betsy Urban
    When fourteen-year-old Deliverance (Livy) Pelton's uncle drowns, she and her younger cousin Ephraim find themselves up for sale at a pauper's auction in a little village on the western frontier of New York. The year is 1793, and while the Revolutionary War is over, conflicts continue in the region, especially between the Seneca Indians and the settlers who had seized land that had belonged to the western tribes. Livy and Ephraim are sold to Gideon Gunn, to help out on his homestead, and they are initially horrified to discover that Gunn has been raised by Indians—and that his Indian brother, Rising Hawk, is staying with the family. Over the next two years, however, Livy and Rising Hawk fall in love, despite the difference in their cultures. Rash statements by Ephraim to a road crew about Indian visitors have terrible consequences for Gideon, but despite much action and adventure (including kidnapping, eye-gouging, fights, and childbirth) the family survives, and Livy and Ephraim realizes that their place is with Rising Hawk and the Gunns. This is a gripping story of frontier hardships, political intrigues, and cultural clashes, but the cover conveys the core of the tale, showing Livy and Rising Hawk back-to-back but together. Their initial antagonism and gradual attraction to each other are believably described, and Livy is a spunky, clear-eyed heroine. Knowing the dangers of childbirth, she refuses to have sex with Rising Hawk, yet pretends that she has in order to be reunited with the Gunns when they are separated. Livy is a memorable character, and this is superior historical fiction. Urban provides a historical note at the front as well as a glossary of people, places, andconcepts at the end to help readers better understand the times.

    Description from KLIATT

    Orphaned at birth, Deliverance "Livy" Pelton has lived all of her fourteen years with her aunt, uncle, and cousins. When her uncle decides to move the family west in 1793, Livy just wants to stay in New England. Her fears are justified: her aunt, uncle, and all of her cousins except for one drown in a river accident. She and her cousin, Ephraim, who is a few years younger than her, are bound out as indentured servants to a homesteader raised by Indians. Livy is supposed to help out his wife and care for the children. But she ends up being sent to educate a village of Indians, the ones that raised her master, how to spin cloth. As the time passes, she begins to wonder if she is falling in love with nineteen-year-old Rising Hawk, her master's brother by adoption. Livy is determined never to marry - her mother died birthing her. But she may have to listen to her heart instead of her head for once. And when her survival depends on it, she may have to trust her life to Rising Hawk. This was a wonderfully written historical novel that I reccomend to teenagers who enjoy stories set in the past.

    Description from Amazon.com Customer Review

    The World Before This One

    By Rafe Martin
    Cast out of the Seneca tribe because they are unable to make war, Crow and his grandmother struggle to survive alone. Then Crow hears the magnificent voice of the Storytelling Stone - an ancient rock that tells the tales of the Long Ago Time, when the Sky Woman trod the Avove World and a child could alter the ways of people. As he listens to the Stone's stories, Crow comes to realize his own power to effect change and his destiny as a Seneca and a man. The World Before This One laces Seneca legends with Crow's narrative to create a thrilling, innovative novel about a boy who may have been the world's first storyteller.

    Description from Publisher

    Written in the style of a novel, this collection of 14 Seneca tales is presented through the retelling of one central story into which all of the others are artfully woven. Each story has been carefully selected for its pertinence to the main tale, which describes how stories from the "Long-Ago Time" were passed on to the Seneca people. After his father's failure to return from a winter hunting trip and his mother and sister die from fever, Crow moves with his grandmother to an old lodge at the edge of the forest to escape from the villagers who consider them to be unlucky. Out hunting for birds one day, Crow comes upon a large Stone that speaks to him, exchanging, for small gifts, stories of the formation of constellations, the creation of the Earth and its people, and the importance of showing kindness and respect to others. The stories show that life's experiences include both pain and happiness; they teach the importance of patience and of learning from others. In the end, the people of the village learn from Grandfather Stone how to listen to stories and how to respond to the teller. Young Crow is acknowledged as the world's first storyteller and becomes a respected member of the community. Martin offers sources for the tales along with an introductory note by Seneca Elder Peter Jemison. Each chapter includes a painstakingly detailed white paper sculpture of a character (often an animal) from one of the stories.

    Description from School Library Journal

    Crow is a Seneca boy who lives with his grandmother apart from their village, having been ostracized from the community and blamed for tragedies the year before. It is Crow's responsibility to hunt and provide for the two of them. On a hunting venture, Crow comes across a boulder that, in exchange for gifts, wants to tell the Long-Ago Time stories. The story of Crow frames the stories of the Storytelling Stone--tales of creation, good and evil, death, and the origins of the world as we know it. The stories entertain, teach the history of the community, and guide the heart and spirit. Martin (The Shark God) has the storyteller's gift of lively descriptive prose, energized by strong verbs and rich details of nature and the Seneca way of life. Newcomer Nicholls's remarkable paper sculptures enliven the text with images of crows, bears, loons, buffalo, and moccasins. The Author's Note sets the stories in their historical context, relating the importance of the Seneca as one of the founding nations of the Iroquois Confederacy and seeing the work as part of a debt owed the Seneca people. An introduction by Seneca Elder Peter Jemison sets the stage for Martin's storytelling in the tradition that's gone before. This is handsome and important, belonging in most collections, but especially for anyone who likes to imagine sitting by a fire hearing a well-told story.

    Description from Kirkus Reviews

    Mary Jemison: White Woman of the Seneca

    By Rayna M. Gangi
    Basing her novel on Mary Jemison's own account of her life and a thorough study of the history of the time, Rayna Gangi tells the true story of the captive white girl who became the wife of a Seneca warrior chief during the French and Indian wars. Captured at fifteen during a raid, this daughter of Scotch-Irish parents was rapidly assimilated into full tribal membership and the responsibilities of womanhood. She bore eight children and became a respected elder in her adopted community. By "becoming" Seneca, Mary Jemison developed the strength, values, and enduring commitment that-together with her own courage-sustained Mary through wrenching personal tragedies in the aftermath of a war the Seneca could not win. An accurate account of events that helped to shape the destiny of the Seneca people, this book has been approved by the Seneca Nation.

    Description from Publisher

    Mary Jemison: White Woman Of The Seneca tells the dramatic life story of a famous Indian Captive who chose to accept the Seneca people as her own, becoming the wife of a warrior chief during the savage Indian-white wars of the eighteenth century. Drawing on painstaking research and a keen sense of time and place, Grayna Gangi's novel presents a compelling and accurate picture of the Seneca way of life and of the people who earned Mary's lifelong loyalty, despite the Seneca raid that resulted in the slaughter of her white family. Captured as a fifteen-year-old girl, this daughter of Irish parents bore eight half-Seneca children and became a beloved and honored member of her adopted community. Gangi conveys a feeling for the "Seneca way" - the integrity, simplicity, and the community ties that, together with her own courage, sustained Mary through wrenching personal tragedies in the aftermath of a war the Seneca could not win.

    Description from Midwest Book Review

    Legends of the Iroquois

    By Tehanetorens
    These ancient stories of the Iroquois are presented both in pictographs and/with English words. The pictographs enable young readers to visualize the method of written communication used by the Iroquois, while the story themselves offer a moral, such as teaching the importance of kindness, wisdom or courage. Children between 10 and 14 will enjoy interpreting the pictographs, which include a key to the symbols and clans of the Six Nations. Highly recommended for school, public and tribal libraries.

    Description from Publisher

    Little Water and the Gift of the Animals

    By C.J.Taylor
    A great hunter, Little Water has a special gift – he can communicate with the animals of the forest, who respect him. One day, when Little Water returns from the hunt, he finds his village silent. Everyone is very sick, and the medicine man cannot cure them. He instructs Little Water to seek help from the animals. But Little Water is caught in a terrible storm and injured. The animals come to his help and give him knowledge of their healing powers. With their help, Little Water is able to save the villagers, who never forget the gift from the forest animals.

    Description from Publisher

    Death on Sacred Ground

    By Harriet K. Feder
    In this third title in the Vivi Hartman mystery series, tenth-grader Vivi and her rabbi father travel to the funeral of a young Orthodox Jewish girl. It seems that pretty, rebellious Mindy Solomon was shot to death during a high-school archery club outing, and the police want to know why she died on snake-ridden Seneca Indian sacred ground, well away from the rest of the group. To complicate things, Seneca teen Jimmy Cloud is missing, and his Jewish girlfriend confides to Vivi that she is being stalked. As Vivi snoops around the tense little town, she discovers other suspects, including local teens who resent the Senecas; members of a born-again-Christian group who have been recruiting Jewish teens; and even Mindy's father. Secondary characters are somewhat flat, but Vivi and her father are appealing, and there's plenty of authentic atmosphere. A multicultural mystery for larger collections.

    Description from Booklist

    Instead of spending winter break in Florida, Vivi Hartman must accompany her rabbi father to Pike's Landing, some sixty miles south of Buffalo. Rabbi Hartman has been asked to preside over a young girl's funeral service in the small town. Making matters worse, Vivi is required to do an ethnography for a social studies project. This means she has to follow a particular person around and study the individual's life. There are several surprises in store for Vivi when she arrives in Pike's Landing. Her assignment for the ethnography is Paula Ash, a girl about her own age. Questions have arisen about the death of the young girl, who it turns out has been violently murdered. Vivi and Paula become involved in an investigation that uncovers secret resentments between Jewish, Christian and Native American residents of Pike's Landing. To get to the bottom of the mystery, Vivi invokes pilpul, a method of logic that Jews practice to understand the Torah. This novel should induce thought-provoking discussion about both Native American and Jewish cultures.

    Description from Children's Literature



    Nonfiction For Older Readers



    The Iroquois

    By Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve
    A simple text and distinctive watercolors provide an introduction to the Iroquois, touching on issues such as sex roles, food preparation, religion, and sports. The brief book, which sails smoothly through hundreds of years of history, also discusses contemporary Iroquois, mentioning that many have kept their traditions alive.

    Description from Horn Book

    Snatches of poems and quotes from historic documents intermingle with Sneve's fact-filled text that traces the history, governance, and culture of the Haudenosaunee, 'those who build the longhouse.' Also called The Five Nations,the original tribes were the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca, joined after 1723 by the Tuscarora to become the Six Nations. From the beautifully retold and illustrated creation myth to current information on the Iroquois today, this picture book will be an excellent source for elementary school research assignments. . . . Himler's apt and abundant illustrations accompany each section, complementing the detail and panorama of the text. Scenes and items portrayed include tools, clothing, war clubs, masks, maple-sugaring, building the longhouse, lacrosse playing, and many more. Highly recommended.

    Description from MultiCultural Review

    If You Lived With the Iroquois

    By Ellen Levine
    Detailed, four-color paintings and a question-and-answer text bring to life the traditional life, customs, and everyday world of the Iroquois - one of the most powerful and influential of the Native Americans.

    Description from Publisher

    Ellen Levine and illustrator Shelly Hehenberger have created a delightful book that takes the young reader into a historical look at life as an Iroquois Indian. The eighty page book is divided into subtitles which concisely tell the story of daily living for the early Iroquois people. As the book is written in second person, the reader is drawn into the story and feels as if he or she is experiencing tribal life. The soft muted colors of the illustrations give the book a feeling of serenity while the writing covers an extraordinary amount of information for young readers.

    Description from Amazon.com Customer Review

    The Iroquois Indians

    By Victoria Sherrow
    The Iroquois Indians once ruled a vast area of North America, striking fear in the hearts of their enemies. Learn how the legendary leader Hiawatha brought five previously warring tribes together to form this mighty confederacy. The Iroquois' rich history continues today as they lead the modern crusade for Indian rights.

    Description from Publisher

    Sherrow begins with the Iroquois' creation stories before moving into a brief survey of pre-Columbian culture. Ceremonies and the founding of the confederacy are given appropriate attention. The author does a good job of making clear that the title does not refer to a single group, but rather to a governmental entity comprised of related peoples. The remainder of the book deals with interactions between the Iroquois and the various European powers who invaded their land, including some recent conflicts. At the book's center, full-color photographs show several of the False Face and Husk Face masks used in the traditional Handsome Lake religion; this section blends well with the text, elaborating on information provided elsewhere. Captions for them and for the black-and-white illustrations are informative and sensitive.

    School Library Journal

    The Oneida

    By L. Gordon McLester and Elisabeth G. Torres
    Opening with a tribal-appropriate creation story or folktale, each title examines Native American origins, ways of life, key historical events, religion and traditions, and family life. Steeped in the culture of Native Americans, each title is written or co-written by an American Indian, and many titles are illustrated by Native American artists. Readers gain an understanding of each nation's past, while discovering what the future holds for the American Indian.

    Despite helping colonists during the American Revolution, the Oneida were pressured to sell most of their New York lands. Some moved to Wisconsin, others to Canada. Excellent wood carvers and basket makers, the Oneida were also accomplished farmers.

    Description from Publisher

    This wonderful book is a rich portrayal of the Oneida people. Young readers and adults will enjoy learning about Oneida Indian nation's history, culture and family life. Readers are well served by this book's co-authors. Gordon McLester guides readers through the life of his Oneida people and Elisabeth Torres shares her teaching skills with a story that is both interesting and chock full of lots of facts and details - even recipes. The Oneida is a delightful book.

    Description from Amazon.com Customer Review

    The Iroquois

    By Petra Press
    In simple but clear narratives, these books describe the history and culture of an American Indian people from long ago to the present. Both are lavishly illustrated, with captioned photographs and reproductions on every page. Topics include religion, society, homes, artwork, history, and contemporary lifestyles. Boldface type highlights words included in the brief glossary, although the texts themselves amply clarify the words in question. A few interesting but little-known tidbits are listed under the heading "Did You Know?" There is also a section called "Want to Know More?" that suggests books, Web sites, and organizations to contact or visit.

    Description from School Library Journal

    The Iroquois: The Six Nations Confederacy

    By Mary Englar
    Bold photography and illustrations, along with captivating text, provide insightful glimpses into American Indian nations of North America. Fascinating descriptions of the history and lifestyles of these nations help readers understand these rich cultures that have endured to this day. Special features throughout these books include biographical profiles, time lines, maps, and recipes.

    Description from Publisher

    Life in a Longhouse Village

    By Bobbie Kalman
    The people who lived in the northeastern woodlands belonged to many nations and spoke many languages including Iroquoian and Algonkian. Life in a Longhouse Village was a way of life all of the nations shared. Children will learn about the fascinating lifestyle of these hunters and farmers and discover what life was like in a longhouse clan.

    Description from Publisher

    The Native Americans of the northeastern region of the United States (and parts of Canada) lived in longhouse villages. These large communities were built along waterways and near good hunting areas. Each longhouse was home to a clan consisting of 15-20 extended families. Structurally, longhouses are similar to barracks, although firepits for cooking and heating were dug into the floors of the longhouses. Kalman has created an interesting account of the daily life in a longhouse village, including the activities of each member, the growth and preparation of food, cultural traditions and celebrations. The illustrations are lively and quite detailed.

    Description from Children's Literature

    Indigenous Peoples of North America:
    The Iroquois

    By Lydia Bjornlund
    The Iroquois looks at the culture of these Native American peoples, focusing particular attention on what made them unique and powerful in seventeenth-century America, on the changes they have endured since the advent of the white man, and on their lasting legacy. Discusses the origins, way of life, spirituality, and social organization of the Iroquois nations, as well as their relationships with the European settlers.

    Description from Publisher

    Roots of the Iroquois

    By Tehanetorens
    The complex history of the Iroquois Confederacy begins with the peace agreement negotiated by two wise men, the Peacemaker and Hiawatha. The Five Nations, comprising the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas, were united before the arrival of the white man, and consisted of an area greater than all of Europe. Their Laws of the Great Peace, set out in the Iroquois constitution, inspired the founding fathers of American democracy. But the arrival of Europeans eventually brought wars over land ownership, and despite support and assistance given to the American revolutionaries, the Iroquois Confederacy was weakened and finally divided by the American government. Making extensive use of quotes from individuals and documents from the period, Tehanetorens, "a master storyteller in the Mohawk tradition," presents readers with a lively, detailed look at Iroquois history, illustrated with a selection of black-and-white drawings. Source notes aren't included, but the insights here will still be helpful to students interested in understanding the Iroquois' past.

    Description from Booklist

    The Iroquois Confederacy (Mohawks, Oneida, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas) used a form of democracy that stood as a model for our fledging American government. This book chronicles the story of the Confederacy since their beginning through their tumultuous relationship with European settlers and our own government. It provides an accurate and valuable account of history during this period, including moving speeches by noted Iroquois chiefs and prophets.

    Description from Publisher

    Lacrosse: The National Game of the Iroquois

    By Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith
    Three generations of lacrosse players are featured in this handsome title that discusses lacrosse as a game, a sport, and an integral part of Iroquois culture. Collaborators Hoyt-Goldsmith and Migdale (Buffalo Days) introduce a contemporary young lacrosse player from upstate New York and describe the equipment, playing field, moves, and rules of modern lacrosse. The author also takes readers back to the beginnings of the game, describing the early Iroquois Confederacy, its government and organization, explaining that "lacrosse was a medicine game played for the well-being of the players, other individuals and the nation. The Iroquois also played in bad times, to cure or prevent disease, or to lift the hearts of the people." She provides a history of early lacrosse as a sport in Canada and as an international game, the making of a traditional lacrosse stick, and a new version called box lacrosse. The author conveys her empathy for the Iroquois and the people of the Onondaga Nation, as well as a great deal of information, with an economy of words. The full-color photographs are appealing and well-placed, extending and enhancing the text.

    Description from Kirkus Reviews

    Hoyt-Goldsmith and Migdale once again (Arctic Hunter, Mardi Gras) present an aspect of traditional culture by filtering it through the life of a contemporary young person. Here, thirteen-year-old Monte Lyons, an "American Indian citizen of the Onondaga Nation, one of the six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy" and his family serve as a springboard for an in-depth look into the little-known origins of the game of lacrosse. Begun as guh-chee-gwuh-ai "long before Europeans came to North America," lacrosse was a religious, ceremonial sport known as the "Creator's game." It was played to "cure or prevent disease,...lift the hearts of people," and "communicate with the spirit world." Full-color, action photographs dominate the spreads and depict various aspects of the sport, ranging from a play-by-play display of particular lacrosse skills to the construction of a traditional wooden lacrosse stick. A concise and descriptive text provides a colorful understanding of the history of lacrosse, seamlessly woven into a general history of the Iroquois Confederacy. Glossary and index.

    Description from Horn Book

    The Iroquois (Lifeways)

    By Raymond Bial
    Lavishly illustrated with archival images and contemporary color photographs, the volumes explore the history and culture of four Native peoples. Each book examines a group's way of life, both past and present, and explains the traditional birth, marriage, and death ceremonies. The clearly written texts also discuss how these nations dealt with encroaching colonialism. Appended are biographical lists of notable people and time lines.

    Description from Horn Book

    In an Author's Note, Bial explains how the books in this "Lifeways" series "depict the social and cultural life of the major (Native American) nations, from the early history of native peoples in North America to their present day struggles for survival and dignity." They do a wonderful job of combining a well-researched, informative text with many striking color photographs and drawings from both the past and present times. The author's style is unusually poetic for a non-fiction book, and the physical design is very appealing. Each volume contains six chapters covering Origins, Villages, Lifeways, Beliefs, Changing World and New Ways. A final section offers more information including A Time Line, Notable People, Glossary, Bibliography, and list of relevant organizations. An index, map, traditional recipe and creation stories are included. This attractive series could be used and enjoyed by a wide age range of readers.

    Description from Children's Literature

    Seneca Chief, Army General: A Story About Ely Parker (Creative Minds Biography)

    By Elizabeth Van Steenwyk
    Ely Parker grew up on the Tonawanda Reservation in New York in the 1830s. There he learned the ways of his people, the Seneca Indians. Ely worked many years to save his reservation from a land company, and as a result, he was made a sachem, or chief, by his people. At the same time, he was working as a translator and ambassador to bridge the gap that divided his people from the white Americans. After serving in the Civil War, Ely went on to become a United States general and lead the agency in charge of Indian affairs. Author Elizabeth Van Steenwyk tells this inspiring, and surprising, story of a man who achieved amazing success in two very different worlds.

    Description from Publisher

    Parker is probably best known as the Native American appointed by Ulysses Grant as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the first Native American to hold that post. His tenure in that office was brief; jealousy and racism brought him under fire from disgruntled opponents, and though he was cleared of any wrongdoing, he resigned. The author spends the first half of the book on the events in Parker's life prior to his fateful meeting with Grant. She describes the difficulties the young boy from the Tonawanda Reservation in New York encountered during his years at a Baptist mission school, on an Iroquois settlement in Canada, and at the academies he attended to further his education. Having decided to study law, he discovered that only American citizens can take the bar exam, and as an Indian, he was not a citizen. Parker was an effective spokesperson and his work earned him the respect of his people. Van Steenwyk writes simply but well about this interesting, and in many ways tragic, man about whom little has been written for children. The book is illustrated with black-and-white drawings; there are no source notes, but there is a bibliography. Harold Felton's Ely S. Parker has fictionalized dialogue and is less forthright about the discrimination Parker faced throughout his life and career. Interesting in its own right, Seneca Chief will also be useful for students needing a biography of a Native American.

    Description from School Library Journal

    A new volume in the Creative Minds Biographies series acquaints middle-grade readers with Ely Parker, a Seneca chief who achieved success in both the Native American and white worlds. Born in 1828 on the Tonawonda Reservation in New York, Ely attended mission schools as well as boarding schools and became an interpreter at age 14. After he fought successfully to save the reservation from a land company, his people made him a sachem, or chief. Following Parker's exemplary service in the Civil War, President Grant appointed him to be commissioner of Indian affairs. Van Steenwyk shares the struggles as well as the successes of this extraordinary man and explores some of the complex issues that Indian people faced in the 1800s.

    Description from Booklist

    The Iroquois

    By Caryn Yacowitz
    Native Americans is a new series that focuses on the Native American culture by examining geographic and cultural groupings as well as the major nations and tribes within each area. These carefully developed titles paint a realistic picture of life during the time when each culture flourished, including details about daily routines, family life, spiritual practices, and the environment in which each people lived. Readers then return to the present as they journey along the chain of events that impacted each group.

    • Informative labeled maps highlight each specific culture.
    • Numerous photographs help students understand the topography and lifestyle.
    • Biographical sketches introduce students to famous people of the past and the present.


    Nonfiction features include a glossary, index, and list of additional reading, particularly for those interested in biographical information.

    Description from Publisher

    New York Indians: A Kid's Look at Our State's Chiefs, Tribes, Reservations, Powwows, Lore & More from the Past & the Present

    By Carole Marsh
    Who were the very first people to live in New York? Who lived, played and hunted where your home and school stand today? American Indians, of course. This book will help you discover the often neglected story of a society where the adults were the ones who played games, where dreams were taken very seriously, where your family was protected by the spirit of an animal and where thieves could steal your name. This A-Z look at New York Indians emphasizes Indian pride, culture, skills and creativity.

    Includes women Indians plus math problems, writing activities and questions for discussion. Free teacher's guide gives specific suggestions & instructions on how to get max educational value from this book.

    Description from Publisher

    Christopher Columbus Comes to New York!

    By Carole Marsh
    This book encourages students to take a fresh look at the encounters between Native Americans and European settlers in New York. In sections like Germ Warfare, A Momentous Miscalculation and more, students learn that history is something to be explored and discovered, not simply memorized. If you want to show students how history can change with the times, this book is a real eye-opener. Use it to instill critical thinking skills - kids must learn to read between the lines of history if they are to understand it.

    Math problems, writing activities, discussion questions and Columbus trivia make this book a whole new world of learning! Free teacher's guide gives specific suggestions and instructions on how to get max educational value from this book. Makes a great supplement to Native American/Indian studies.

    Description from Publisher

    Wampum Belts of the Iroquois

    By Ray Fadden Tehanetorens
    Describes the nature and significance of Indian wampum belts, focusing on their history and uses by the Iroquois.

    Description from Publisher

    Hiawatha: Founder of the Iroquois Confederacy

    By Nancy Bonvillain
    Hiawatha is revered among the Iroquois people as a hero of mythic proportions. His greatest accomplishment was the founding of the Iroquois Confederacy, a league of Indian nations that stresses cooperation, peace, and unity.

    Description from Publisher

    Not the Hiawatha of Longfellow, this is the equally legendary but real fifteenth-century Onondaga chief, whose fame is based on his success in bringing peace among warring tribes. Bonvillain traces the history of the Iroquois as well. Fascinating reading, illustrated with a variety of black-and-white drawings, paintings, and photographs.

    Description from Horn Book

    The Mohawk

    By Nancy Bonvillain
    The Mohawk thrived for centuries in their lush homeland in what is now New York State. With the Oneida, the Onondaga, the Cayuga, and the Seneca, they shared a position of enormous power as members of the mighty Iroquois Confederacy.

    Description from Publisher

    The Iroquois

    By Barbara A. McCall
    Examines the history, traditional lifestyle, and current situation of the Iroquois Indians.

    Description from Publisher

    Little Water and the Gift of the Animals: A Seneca Legend

    By Carrie J. Taylor
    A great hunter, Little Water has a special gift – he can communicate with the animals of the forest, who respect him. One day, when Little Water returns from the hunt, he finds his village silent. Everyone is very sick, and the medicine man cannot cure them. He instructs Little Water to seek help from the animals. But Little Water is caught in a terrible storm and injured. The animals come to his help and give him knowledge of their healing powers. With their help, Little Water is able to save the villagers, who never forget the gift from the forest animals.

    Description from Publisher

    The Iroquois

    By Barbara Graymont
    The Iroquois traditionally lived in what is now upstate New York, subsisting on wild plant foods, game, and fish from the area's fertile forests and teeming waterways, along with corn, beans, and squash.A volume in the series of Indians of North America.

    Also known as the Six Nations, the Iroquois was an alliance of tribes. Fearsome in war, they fought to extend their territory and allied with the English in the Revolutionary War. Today, Iroquois live in Canada, New York, Wisconsin, and Oklahoma.

    Description from Publisher

    Two more solid additions to this series. Both feature scholarly research balanced between the history and present conditions of the tribes. Photographs of artifacts and maps and detailed illustrations aid understanding of the tribes, and, in addition to supporting the text, make the books interesting for browsing. Especially nice are the folklore passages which may spur teachers and students to pursue other tribal folktales to better understand these people. Bibliographies, facts at a glance, glossaries, and indexes add to the usefulness of these responsible works.

    Description from School Library Journal

    The Iroquois Indians

    By Bill Lund
    Bold photography and captivating text provide insightful glimpses into American Indian nations of North America. Fascinating descriptions of the history and lifestyles of these nations help readers understand rich cultures enduring to this day.

    Description from Publisher

    Wigwam and the Longhouse

    By Charlotte and David Yue

    Awards:
    • 2000 Parents' Choice® Recommended winner

    Before the white men came to America, woodlands stretched from the Atlantic to the Mississippi, from Canada south to what is now Virginia. In the clearings of this deep forest, and on the shores of lakes and rivers, the native people built their villages. The forest provided them with food and supplied the materials from which they constructed their houses. In this generously illustrated book, Charlotte and David Yue chronicle the daily lives of the woodland people.

    Description from Publisher

    Before the arrival of Europeans, the people who lived in the woodlands of North America had come to a unique way of living in harmony with their environment. Most of the time, these Woodland Indians lived and worked outside. Their communal shelters became known as the wigwam and the longhouse. This easy-to-understand, interesting work of non-fiction, liberally illustrated, describes the daily lives of people in a culture now lost. The tone of the prose chillingly conveys the decimation of these Native Americans.

    Description from Parents' Choice

    Continuing in the tradition of their previous books, The Igloo and The Pueblo, the Yues have created a useful book describing and illustrating the homes and lifestyles of early woodland tribes. They begin with a description of the Eastern Woodlands, stretching from the Atlantic Ocean across the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River Valley and from Newfoundland and southern Canada to Virginia and North Carolina. Detailed diagrams enable the reader to envision the trees, shrubs, and berries of the area. Text and illustrations combine to provide a clear understanding of the steps in construction of wigwams and longhouses. Family life, clothing, food, and recreation are among the topics included to provide a sense of what life was like for these ancient people. A table of contents, bibliography, and index make this a valuable resource for study and research.

    Description from Children's Literature

    A marvelous addition to any collection. The Yues' focus is on the structures of several tribes of the eastern woodlands. However, in addressing these topics, the authors also cover many other aspects of Native life: communities and tribal divisions; daily, seasonal, and yearly life; and religious practices. Readers will be drawn in to this accessible, well-researched text as it imparts fascinating tidbits and a respect for these people and their lives. Simple, yet detailed black-and-white illustrations in pen and ink and watercolor and well-labeled diagrams add richly to the text. The wide-ranging bibliography notes titles appropriate for younger readers. A clearly written, well-organized title.

    Description from School Library Journal

    An illustrated description of the land, history, and culture of American Indians of the Northeast woodlands, written by the author/illustrators of The Igloo, The Pueblo, and other well-regarded nonfiction for older children. The native peoples of the northeastern parts of North America evolved a culture and way of life perfectly suited to their environment. Every aspect of their society, from agricultural practices to ceremonies, religion, politics, and their houses, reflected their culture's emphasis on harmony, balance, and the responsibilities that all living things have towards one another. By describing with clarity, accuracy, and respect—but without sentimentality or fawning—every aspect of these people's lives, the authors bring them to life and deepen the reader's understanding of what was lost—and what survives. In both their illustrations and text, the Yues use telling details to give a strong sense of what life was like in an Iroquois or Algonquin village before the white men came. While they are respectful of their subjects' beliefs, the authors do not shirk from describing those less exemplary aspects of Northeast Woodland Indian culture, particularly the role of war in their society and their cruelty towards enemies and prisoners. This balance extends most notably to the chapter on how the coming of the white man changed the lives of the native peoples ("The Clash of Cultures"). The authors describe how economic factors disrupted the native people's lives, as did loss of land, introduction of disease, religious conversion, and displacement by white settlers. They also make clear that Native Americans didnotpassively accept the loss of their lands and disruption of their culture, but responded and adapted to change, creating ways to keep their culture alive today. A fine addition to an invaluable body of work by a proven team, and an essential purchase for school and public libraries.

    Description from Kirkus Reviews

    Joseph Brant: Mohawk Chief

    By Claire Wilson
    Joseph Brant was a success in the Indian culture as well as the European world. He led a band of British and Indian soldiers during the Revolutionary War, and used his diplomatic talents in battling the white man’s seizure of Indian land. Brant held a unique position of power during one of the most volatile periods of American history.

    Examines the life of the Mohawk chief, missionary, and statesman who led his people on the side of the British in the Revolutionary War.

    Description from Publisher

    Iroquois

    By Liz Sonneborn

    Forest Diplomat: The Story of Hiawatha

    By Jill C. Wheeler

    New York Native Peoples

    By Mark Stewart




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